fbpx

Speakers

In addition to our stellar lineup of General Sessions, we are thrilled to highlight the following featured sessions for #NCTE21.

Featured Session: Thursday, November 18, "Deeper Than Edutainment: Taking Books and Their Film Adaptations Seriously"

Randy-Michael Testa

Featured Session: "Bearing Witness: A Media-Literate Approach to Antiracist Teaching"
Thursday, November 18 | 6:00–7:15 p.m. ET

Randy Testa creates online learning courses for professional development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and teaches courses on the use of books with their film adaptations in the Graduate School of Education. He holds workshops on storytelling, media literacy, and antiracist teaching and works on movie projects with studios. Testa worked in the movie industry for twelve years on film adaptations like The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, Because of Winn-Dixie, Bridge to Terabithia, and Charlotte’s Web. Testa holds his EdM and EdD from Harvard and is currently working on an online program titled Moral Leadership in a Troubled Time: Lessons from the Life of John Rabe.

Featured Session: Friday, November 19, "Choice and Voice: What It Means to be an Independent Reader"

Kylene Beers

Featured Session: "Choice and Voice: What It Means to be an Independent Reader"
Friday, November 19 | 4:15–5:30 p.m. ET

Kylene Beers is the bestselling author or co-author of numerous books, including When Kids Can’t Read/What Teachers Can Do, Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading, Disrupting Thinking, and Forged by Reading. Disrupting Thinking was named the 2018 Teachers Choices Award professional book. Kylene is an international consultant on literacy issues, a past president of NCTE, and a recipient of the CEL Leadership Award. She lives on her ranch outside of Waco, Texas. Follow her on Twitter at @KyleneBeers or on her blog at KyleneBeers.com.

Jerry Craft

Featured Session: "Choice and Voice: What It Means to be an Independent Reader"
Friday, November 19 | 4:15–5:30 p.m. ET

Jerry Craft is a New York Times–bestselling author-illustrator who has worked on numerous picture books, graphic novels, and middle grade novels, including the Newbery award–winning graphic novel New Kid. Jerry is the creator of Mama’s Boyz, an award-winning syndicated comic strip. He has won five African American Literary Awards and is a cofounder of the Schomburg Center’s Annual Black Comic Book Festival. He received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts and now lives in Connecticut. Visit him online at www.jerrycraft.com.

Featured Session: Friday, November 19, "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"

Carol D. Lee

Featured Session: "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"
Friday, November 19 | 5:45–7:00 p.m. ET

Carol D. Lee is the Edwina S. Tarry Professor Emerita at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on cultural and ecological supports for learning, with a special focus on disciplinary literacies. She is the President-Elect of the National Academy of Education, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, past cochair of the NCTE Research Assembly, and past president of the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy. She is the 2021 recipient of the James R. Squire Award from NCTE, the Distinguished Contributions to Research Award from AERA, and the 2021 McGraw Award for Research in the Learning Sciences. She serves as chair of the committee that produced the National Academy of Education’s report Educating for Civic Reasoning and Discourse. She is a former high school English teacher and the founder of three African centered schools in Chicago spanning a 49-year history.

Antero Garcia

Featured Session: "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"
Friday, November 19 | 5:45–7:00 p.m. ET

Antero Garcia is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His work explores how technology and gaming shape learning, literacy practices, and civic identities. Prior to completing his PhD, Antero was an English teacher at a public high school in South Central Los Angeles.

Nicole Mirra

Featured Session: "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"
Friday, November 19 | 5:45–7:00 p.m. ET

Nicole Mirra is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. She previously taught high school English language arts in Brooklyn, New York, and Los Angeles, California. Her research explores the intersections of critical literacy and civic engagement with youth and teachers across classroom, community, and digital learning environments. Central to her research and teaching agenda is a commitment to honoring and amplifying the literacy practices and linguistic resources that students from minoritized communities use to challenge and reimagine civic life. Her most recent book is Educating for Empathy: Literacy Learning and Civic Engagement (Teachers College Press, 2018) and she is a coauthor (with Antero Garcia and Ernest Morrell) of Doing Youth Participatory Action Research: Transforming Inquiry with Researchers, Educators, and Students (Routledge, 2015).

Na'ilah Suad Nasir

Featured Session: "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"
Friday, November 19 | 5:45–7:00 p.m. ET

Na’ilah Suad Nasir is the sixth president of the Spencer Foundation, which funds education research nationally. She has held a faculty appointment in education and African American studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where she also served as the chair of African American studies, then later as Vice Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion. She also served on the faculty of the Stanford Graduate School of Education from 2000 to 2008.

Nasir’s research examines the racialized and cultural nature of learning and schooling, with a particular focus on the experiences of African American students in schools and communities. She recently coedited The Handbook of the Cultural Foundations of Learning (Routledge) and We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Educational Life of Black Boys. She is also the author of Racialized Identities: Race and Achievement for African-American Youth, published by the Stanford University Press in 2012. Nasir is a member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She chairs the board of the National Equity Project and serves as an advisory board member for the Public Policy Institute of California and the Division of Letters and Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also the president of the American Educational Research Association for 2021–2022.

Kris D. Gutiérrez

Featured Session: "Civic Reasoning and Discourse: The Role of Literacy Instruction in K-12 Classrooms"
Friday, November 19 | 5:45–7:00 p.m. ET

Kris D. Gutiérrez is the Carol Liu Professor and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. Gutiérrez brings a critical approach to her work in the learning sciences, literacy, educational policy, and qualitative and design-based approaches to inquiry. Gutiérrez is a member of the National Academy of Education, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of AERA and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She is the past president of the American Educational Research Association and was appointed by President Obama to the National Board for the Institute of Education Sciences, for which she served as vice-chair. Gutiérrez’s research examines learning in designed environments, with attention to students from nondominant communities and translingual populations. Her general focus is on the cultural dimensions of learning.  Her work on Third Spaces examines the affordances of syncretic approaches to learning, digital and STEM learning, and the remediation of functional systems of learning.  Her work in social design experiments offers a utopian methodology that foregrounds the political and ethnical dimensions of design research and is concerned with possible futures.

Featured Session: Saturday, November 20, "Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities"

Tamara Butler

Featured Session: "Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities"
Saturday, November 20 | 3:45–5:00 p.m. ET

Dr. Tamara T. Butler is the Executive Director of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture and Associate Dean of Strategic Planning & Community Engagement in the College of Charleston Libraries. Tamara returned to her South Carolina Sea Island community to continue documenting Black women's memories of and connections to land/place. Currently, she serves as a member of ELATE's (English Language Arts Teacher Education) Executive Committee.

Valerie Kinloch

Featured Session: "Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities"
Saturday, November 20 | 3:45–5:00 p.m. ET

Valerie Kinloch is the Renée and Richard Goldman Endowed Dean and Professor of the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. She is Co-Chair of Remake Learning, a member of the NCTE Presidential Team, and a member of the Board of Trustees of her undergraduate alma mater (Johnson C. Smith University). She was born and raised in Charleston, SC, where she completed her K-12 public school education.

Her scholarship examines the literacies of youth and adults in school and community contexts. Author of publications on race, place, literacy, and equity, she has written on poet June Jordan, on critical perspectives on language and learning, and on community engagement. Her book, Harlem On Our Minds: Place, Race, and the Literacies of Urban Youth, received the 2010 Outstanding Book of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Her most recent co-edited book is Race, Justice, and Activism in Literacy Instruction (Teachers College Press, 2020), and her newly published co-authored book is Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities (Teachers College Press & NCTE, 2021).

Valerie is also a Fellow of the American Education Research Association (AERA) and a Fellow of the American Council on Education (ACE). She is a past recipient of AERA’s Scholars of Color Early Career Award and NCTE’s Rewey Belle Inglis Award for Outstanding Women in English Education and its Advancement of People of Color Leadership Award.

Emily Nemeth

Featured Session: "Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities"
Saturday, November 20 | 3:45–5:00 p.m. ET

Emily Nemeth is an assistant professor in the Department of Education at Denison University. She holds a BA in Educational Studies and Spanish from Denison University; an MEd in Higher Education, Service Learning, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst; and a PhD in Adolescent, Post-Secondary, and Community Literacies from The Ohio State University. She began her career in education as a corps member for City Year AmeriCorps. Nemeth teaches courses in literacy, community engagement, and equity pedagogies. Her research explores the literacy lives of adolescent youth in community contexts and the learning opportunities afforded by expanding space and literacy resources through service learning.

Grace D. Player

Featured Session: "Where is the Justice? Engaged Pedagogies in Schools and Communities"
Saturday, November 20 | 3:45–5:00 p.m. ET

Grace D. Player is a literacy scholar, educator, and artist who has a longstanding commitment to collaborating with communities of color. Following a career of classroom teaching and literacy professional development, she pursued her PhD at the University of Pennsylvania, where she developed as a community partner, researcher, and educator. Her work takes on a feminist-of-color lens and inquires into how girls and women of color mobilize their raced, gendered, and cultural knowledges and ways of knowing to forge sisterhoods that resist injustice and transform worlds. Player’s work also takes on methods that center relationality, story, art, and aesthetics as ways of making meaning. She is currently an assistant professor of literacy at the University of Connecticut Neag School of Education, where her latest research is in partnership with a critical autoethnographic coalition of preservice and early-career, women-of-color teachers.

Featured Session: Sunday, November 21, "Genius, Joy, and Love"

Dr. Gholnecsar (Gholdy) Muhammad

Featured Session: "Genius, Joy, and Love"
Sunday, November 21 | 9:00–10:15 a.m. ET

Dr. Gholnecsar (Gholdy) Muhammad is an associate professor of Literacy, Language, and Culture at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She studies Black historical excellence within educational communities with goals of reframing curriculum and instruction today. Dr. Muhammad’s scholarship has appeared in leading educational journals and books. She has received numerous national awards and is the author of the bestselling book Cultivating Genius: An Equity Model for Culturally and Historically Responsive Literacy.

Dr. Shamari Reid

Featured Session: "Genius, Joy, and Love"
Sunday, November 21 | 9:00–10:15 a.m. ET

Dr. Shamari Reid is an assistant professor of Critical Studies in Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Reid’s research focuses on working with Black trans and queer youth and their communities to reimagine the ways we approach social justice teaching, learning, and educational leadership. You can engage more with Dr. Reid and his work on his personal website: shamarireid.com.

Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz

Featured Session: "Genius, Joy, and Love"
Sunday, November 21 | 9:00–10:15 a.m. ET

Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz is an award-winning associate professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on racial literacy in teacher education, Black girl literacies, and Black and Latinx male high school students. A sought-after speaker on issues of race, culturally responsive pedagogy, and diversity, Sealey-Ruiz works with K-12 and higher education school communities to increase their racial literacy knowledge and move toward more equitable school experiences for their Black and Latinx students. Sealey-Ruiz appeared in Spike Lee’s "2 Fists Up: We Gon’ Be Alright", a documentary about the Black Lives Matter movement and the campus protests at Mizzou. Her co-authored book [with Dr. Detra Price-Dennis] Advancing Racial Literacies in Teacher Education: Toward Activism for Equity in Digital Spaces was published in April 2021. Her first full-length collection of poetry Love from the Vortex & Other Poems (Kalediscope Vibrations LLC) was published in March, 2021, and her sophomore book of poetry, The Peace Chronicles was released in Summer 2021.

Anyah Nancy Jackson

Featured Session: "Genius, Joy, and Love"
Sunday, November 21 | 9:00–10:15 a.m. ET

Anyah Nancy Jackson is a full-time student at Temple University with a major in Africology and a minor in sociology. She is the founder of Black Women of Temple University, a singer and performer, and a published journalist with Philadelphia INC magazine. Anyah will graduate from Temple University in December and start her master's in education in the fall while teaching K–4 special education in the greater Philadelphia area.

Featured Session: "#BlackBoyLiteraciesMatter/s: A Retrospective Dialogue about Black Boyhood, Literacy, and Thrival in Buffalo, NY"

Jevon D. Hunter

Featured Session: "#BlackBoyLiteraciesMatter/s: A Retrospective Dialogue about Black Boyhood, Literacy, and Thrival in Buffalo, NY"
Sunday, November 21 | 3:00–4:15 p.m. ET

Jevon D. Hunter is the Woods-Beals Endowed Chair for Urban Education in the School of Education at SUNY Buffalo State College. He is a literacy justice educator who works with African, African descended, and urban youth, designing literacy activities that engage young people in emancipatory, restorative, and liberating literacy practices that center their voices, experiences, and expertise. His interests and engagement are principally collaborative, partnering with youth, their teachers, and others to envision and implement new forms of literacy participation for our young people to shine in school and life. He is the 2021 recipient of NCTE's Edwin M. Hopkins Award for outstanding article published in the English Journal, for his work with Buffalo youth and a form of short verse poetry he calls critical micropoetry.